Bringing in the Last of the Winter Crops

I took this week off to work in the garden, but I didn’t realize how much time it was going to take. Other than taking time off for the Sabbath and Passover, I have worked 8 to 10 hour days in the garden; and I still have yet to start spring planting! (That begins today, though.) However, my garden beds look beautiful and ready to plant now that I’ve harvested the last of my winter crops, weeded in and around the beds (filling TEN four-feet-tall lawn & leaf bags!), supplemented my soil with Azomite (rock dust) and compost, and top dressed the cypress mulch around my beds. (I’ll share pictures in my next Sanctuary Gardener Update post.) It’s been a lot of work, but I have everything ready for seed and seedlings, and a refrigerator full of root veggies and greens. The last of my winter crops!

Sanctuary Gardener Update ~ 1/12/15

This past week, Charleston got a little taste of the winter the rest of the country usually gets. Of course, our temperatures weren’t near as low as many of you had to deal with. But the night of January 7, we got down to 18 degrees. In fact, we spent close to 48 hours below freezing! Needless to say, my hoop tunnels and key lime trees stayed covered for 4 days. The day time highs weren’t sufficient to uncover them and then have to recover them for the freezing temperatures at night. A couple days ago, the post-freeze garden inspection began. This week’s garden photos!

Sanctuary Gardener Update ~ 12/22/14

The weather has been fairly mild the past week, and I’ve been able to leave the plastic off my hoop tunnels at night. That’s been great as my plants need some direct sunlight – and the rain we’re now getting. I harvested a few things, and I noticed some seedlings finally germinated. A typical quiet week in my December garden. This week’s garden photos!

Sanctuary Gardener Update ~ 11/10/14

The winter weather forecast for the Southeast is calling for a colder-than-normal winter, and I think it’s right. Last Saturday night we had our first frost – two weeks early. I woke up Sunday morning to a temperature of 32 degrees, and ran outside to see the damage. Thankfully, almost everything survived the frost. The only plants that showed frost damage were my pumpkin vines. I guess, because the leaves are so large, they presented too much surface area to not be affected by the frost. However, I’m hoping enough leaves survived to keep the photosynthesis going until all my pumpkins mature. Other than that, my garden is still plugging along. This week’s garden photos!