How My Garden Grows in January 2015 ~ Part 2

Yesterday, I shared my first 2015 installment in my monthly series, How My Garden Grows. If you missed it, you can see my side beds and closeup photos of raised beds 1-9 in Part 1. Today, I’m sharing photos of raised beds 10-20.

BED 10 – Kale, escarole, & arugula

I planted these in the fall, and I’m still harvesting. The Scotch Curled kale isn’t as big as it normally gets, probably because it doesn’t get as much sun in the back of the bed. The escarole got somewhat frostbitten in the hard frost, but it’s salvageable and still growing. My arugula is bolting, so I’m going to let it flower – then taste the flowers for the first time.

Bed 10 in January 2015 ~ Kale, escarole, & arugula

Bed 10 in January 2015 ~ Kale, escarole, & arugula

BED 11 – Fallow

This bed held my string beans before last frost. Now it’s fallow, covered in leaves, awaiting spring planting.

Bed 11 in January 2015 ~ Fallow

Bed 11 in January 2015 ~ Fallow

BED 12 – Chard & Fallow

In the back of this bed, I planted chard last spring. Chard can be perennial if the winters aren’t too severe. I have a few plants that are looking a little rough, but they may come back in the spring. I will plant more chard, too. The rest of the bed lies fallow, under leaves.

Bed 12 in January 2015 ~ Chard & fallow

Bed 12 in January 2015 ~ Chard & fallow

BED 12x – Fallow

We installed this bed to the left of bed 13, so to keep continuity in my bed numbering (for purposes of my garden journal), we dubbed this bed 12x. It held my eggplant last year, and now it’s fallow.

Bed 12x in January 2015 ~ Fallow

Bed 12x in January 2015 ~ Fallow

BED 13 – Raspberries

These are my Caroline everbearing raspberries. The canes will be a year old in March. Well, a year in my garden anyway. Because they’re everbearing, I will be getting a second crop of berries from these canes in the late spring. You can see some weeds growing among my canes. Because my arms are short and the canes are prickly, I’m waiting for my Garden Wilson to help me weed this bed.

Bed 13 in January 2015 ~ Raspberries

Bed 13 in January 2015 ~ Raspberries

BED 14 – Asparagus

This will be my fourth year with my Mary Washington asparagus, planted in the back of the bed. I have a couple of Purple Passion asparagus in the front of the bed that actually grew last year, so it will be my second year with them. (I don’t know what happened to the rest of the roots.) I wanted to weed this bed, but I noticed a huge fire ant hill (on the left side). I need to kill those suckers first before I get my hands anywhere near that bed – and before the asparagus starts coming up next month.

Bed 14 in January 2015 ~ Asparagus

Bed 14 in January 2015 ~ Asparagus

BED 15 – Spinach & lettuce

Once again, I’m having trouble with my spinach germinating. I planted more Bloomsdale spinach, but have only a couple of small plants growing. My lettuce seedlings are Buttercrunch, Black Seeded Simpson, Reine des Glaces, and Red Sails. When the temperature is forecast to go below freezing, I put the plastic on my hoop tunnel.

Bed 15 in January 2015 ~ Spinach & lettuce

Bed 15 in January 2015 ~ Spinach & lettuce

BED 16 – Carrots

My Parisienne carrots didn’t germinate as well as my Scarlet Nantes carrots did. I have only a handful of them, but lots of Nantes! This bed also gets covered when the night time temps go below freezing.

Bed 16 in January 2015 ~ Carrots

Bed 16 in January 2015 ~ Carrots

BED 17 – Turnips, radishes, & brussels sprouts

For the first time, after three attempts, my brussels sprouts germinated. They were late due to the excessive fall heat, so they were small when first frost came around. I transplanted them into this bed so I could cover the hoop tunnel to protect them from hard frost while they grow sprouts. (These are cool weather plants that are difficult to grow here in the south.) From the front of the bed, I’m growing second crops of Purple Top turnips, Golden Globe turnips, Watermelon radishes (yes, more), and Purple Plum radishes. The brussels sprouts are in the back of the bed.

Bed 17 in January 2015 ~ Turnips, radishes, brussels sprouts

Bed 17 in January 2015 ~ Turnips, radishes, brussels sprouts

BED 18 – Beets

My beets germinated better this year than last year, but they’re still not growing as well as they should. However, I have harvested some and have some new seedlings growing among the more mature plants. In the front part of the bed are Early Wonder beets and in the back are Chioggia beets. Beets can’t handle frosts very well, so I definitely cover this bed when the temperatures go below freezing.

Bed 18 in January 2015 ~ Beets

Bed 18 in January 2015 ~ Beets

BED 19 – Fallow

This bed had my peanuts and some peppers in it last year, but now it’s fallow – except for a lone head of Reine des Glaces lettuce from a stray seed. It’s almost ready to harvest.

Bed 19 in January 2015 ~ Fallow

Bed 19 in January 2015 ~ Fallow

BED 20 – Fallow

This bed had my Purple Top turnips in it until a week or so ago when I harvested the last of them. It’s now fallow and needing some leaves to cover it.

Bed 20 in January 2015 ~ Fallow

Bed 20 in January 2015 ~ Fallow

Again, if you missed seeing the first half of my garden, please see How My Garden Grows in January 2015 Part 1.

How is your garden growing this month? Or is it?

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2 comments on “How My Garden Grows in January 2015 ~ Part 2

  1. Hi Rosemarie!
    This is my third winter garden in SC and I am learning a lot about winter gardening as I go along. I was mislead my first year here by an unusually warm winter during which my greens and turnips grew all winter long. I am learning that is not always the case.:-)
    I find that collards, turnips, arugula and carrots do well for me (uncovered) in the winter. They grow well enough to be picked at a decent size. Next year, I am going to plant chard, kale, bok choi, carrots and lettuce under row covers in the fall and then let them overwinter and mature in the early spring. Kind of a “plant and forget about ’em” sort of mind set. If the winter is mild, I may do a bit of harvesting in the winter.
    I am giving up on beets.
    Thank you for your postings!

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