How My Garden Grows in September ~ Part 2

On Wednesday, I shared with you pictures of the first half of my garden (beds 1-9). If you missed it, check out Part 1.) Today, I’ll share with you the rest of my garden (beds 10-20) in the midst of seasonal transition. Be sure to click the links included so you can see how each bed looked last month.

BED 10 – Kale, Escarole, and Arugula

This bed was fallow last month, but the past weekend, I planted Scotch Curled Kale, Batavian Full Heart Escarole, and Arugula. I then mulched with grass clippings.

Bed 10 in September ~ Kale, Escarole, & Arugula

Bed 10 in September ~ Kale, Escarole, & Arugula

BED 11 – Snap beans

One month ago, the seedlings hadn’t even come up yet. Now look at my second planting of snap beans! They’re now flowering. I’ve got Beurre de Rocquencourt wax beans in the back of the bed, and Black Valentine green beans in the front.

Bed 11 in September ~ Snap beans

Bed 11 in September ~ Snap beans

BED 12 – Peruvian peppers & swiss chard

These lemon drop peppers and rocoto peppers are growing like crazy, despite the heat! (Click here to see them last month.) They’re so big, you can’t see the chard in the back of the bed, though you’re not missing much. They almost died, but it looks like there are some new leaves coming.

Bed 12 in September ~ Peruvian peppers & swiss chard

Bed 12 in September ~ Peruvian peppers & swiss chard

BED 12x – Eggplant

My eggplant may be taller than last month, but they’re not as bushy. Although eggplants love heat, this summer was brutal. They lost quite a few leaves in their distress and produced about half the fruit they normally do. Maybe I’ll get some more fruit now that the weather has cooled off. (Black Beauty eggplants are in the back of the bed, and Listada de Gandia eggplants are in the front.)

Bed 12x in September ~ Eggplant

Bed 12x in September ~ Eggplant

BED 13 – Raspberries

I planted these canes in March this year, and they’re doing well. They do look a little less healthy than they did last month, but the sun really beat them up. However, they are still fruiting and ripening. In fact, I’ve harvested about 5.5 pounds of raspberries so far. I’m told that I shouldn’t be able to raise raspberries in Charleston, but I am!

Bed 13 in September ~ Caroline raspberries

Bed 13 in September ~ Caroline raspberries

BED 14 – Asparagus

You can’t see much change in my asparagus from last month – except a few ferns are starting to turn yellow as fall approaches. My Mary Washington asparagus (back of the bed) didn’t do as well this year as last year, but during the summer, it started to fill in. Alas, my newly-planted Purple Passion asparagus (front of the bed) didn’t come up like it should have. I have two little plants in the middle, but that’s all. I think I’ll just let everything reseed on its own.

Bed 14 in September ~ Asparagus

Bed 14 in September ~ Asparagus

BED 15 – Dixie speckled butter peas

What a difference a month makes in the summer heat of South Carolina. My butter peas aren’t as lush looking as they were last month. A couple of large grasshoppers didn’t help either! They ate all my initial harvest of butter pea pods. They have since come to the end of their circle of life, thanks to my Garden Wilson. And now, my butter peas are flowering, full of bees, and producing small pods again.

Bed 15 in September ~ Dixie speckled butter peas

Bed 15 in September ~ Dixie speckled butter peas

BED 16 – Fallow

This bed has been fallow since I pulled my garlic up in June and has been used, off and on, to hold the grass clippings I use for mulch. Last month, it was empty. This month, I’m digging into a mulch pile. This coming weekend, I’ll be planting Parisienne and Scarlet Nantes carrots in this bed. I’m a month late with that, but it’s been too darn hot until recently.

Bed 16 in September ~ Fallow, awaiting carrot seed

Bed 16 in September ~ Fallow, awaiting carrot seed

BED 17 – Lima beans

Ah, my poor lima beans. They’ve been eaten by grasshoppers and brutalized by the sun for much longer than my butter peas. (Click here to see them last month.) I’ve harvested quite a bit from this bed, but I’m hoping to get more before frost. I noticed that they’re starting to flower again, so I’m hopeful.

Bed 17 in September ~ Henderson lima beans

Bed 17 in September ~ Henderson lima beans

BED 18 – Beets

Last month, this bed was fallow. This past weekend, I planted Chioggia and Early Wonder beets. Again, I mulched with grass clippings. Grow, beets, grow!

Bed 18 in September - beets

Bed 18 in September – beets

BED 19 – Peppers and peanuts

Compared to last month, you can see the peppers have grown. The peanuts (in the back of the bed) are still spreading out. It’s a good thing less than 25% of my seed germinated. I had no idea how wide peanut plants get! One plant had a branch hanging off the side of the bed; when I went to push it in, I saw several peanuts growing on it! Wow! (Yes, I pushed them into some dirt.

Bed 19 in September ~ Peppers and peanuts

Bed 19 in September ~ Peppers and peanuts

BED 20 – Tomatoes, peppers, and herbs

Since last month, I pulled a couple of the Black Krim tomatoes in the back of the bed and trimmed the other two. I’m hoping I may get some more tomatoes out of them. The front tomato plant (a Wisconsin tomato) already has fruit growing on it again. Yippee! The chili pepper plants are fruiting well again now, too. In the middle of the bed are summer savory and basil, which will get harvested (and dried) this weekend to make room for Purple-Top Turnips.

Bed 20 in September ~ Tomatoes, peppers, and herbs

Bed 20 in September ~ Tomatoes, peppers, and herbs

Again, if you missed the August pictures of my garden set up and beds 1-9, go to How My Garden Grows in September Part 1. Next month, I’ll post pictures of my beds again, to see the changes another month brings. (And, for a little tease, at the end of the year, I’ll present a slide show of my garden through the seasons. 🙂 )

How is your garden growing?

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2 comments on “How My Garden Grows in September ~ Part 2

  1. In my second year, SC garden, pak choi and turnips have come up from seed and are doing well. Just planted carrots, beets and chard. Collard and kale transplants also growing well after a bout with caterpillars. I had to handpick them off for several days. Yellow squash, Zepher, has been growing and producing steadily all season under a lightweight row cover and being hand pollinated. A huge success! Most tomatoes are gone. Japanese eggplant has slowed down, but has done well all season. Raspberries are pathetic! They did well last year, their first, but not this year. I see some new growth and will weed and compost them this weekend. Pole beans are trying to make a comeback, picked a handful 3 days ago. Strawberries are running like crazy. Citrus trees are growing well, but no fruit this year. Almost lost the lime last winter when it became uncovered in the ice storm. It has completely recovered. Arugula did very poorly. Broccoli transplants are holding on. Lost about a third of them to some chewing critter I could never find. All, in all, not a bad year. More challenging than gardening in Michigan, but at least I can garden year around! Thank you so much for your postings. I read them everday and enjoy being connected to another serious gardener, especially one almost in my neighborhood!

    • I’m just now getting my fall seed in the ground. It was way too hot to germinate, then it rained. I’ve planted my beets, brussels sprouts, kale, arugula, lettuce, and escarole so far. This weekend, I’ll plant carrots, turnips, and radishes. Next weekend, I’ll plant onions, garlic, spinach, and mustard greens.

      My garden didn’t do as well this year (so far) as last year, due to the heat, I’m sure. However, it’s cooling off, so my pepper harvests may increase substantially enough to compare well with last year. My tomatoes lasted longer this year than last year, so I’m improving there! My melons did better, and I learned more about the squash. Finally got pumpkins! My raspberries (first year on these new canes) are doing pretty well.

      At the end of the year, I’ll be able to make a good comparison to last year – and I’ll share it with everyone.

      Congrats on your garden! I love to hear how everyone else is doing, growing their own food.

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