Foliar Sprays for the Garden

Foliar Sprays for the Garden pic

Although I’ve written about these various foliar sprays for the garden, I’ve had so many people ask for the “recipes,” I thought I’d gather them all in one post for your convenience. These foliar sprays will provide your plants with nutrition and help them fight off disease – with ingredients commonly found around the home.

Aspirin Foliar Spray

This spray helps strengthen a plant’s immune system and is especially good for tomatoes. If you’d like to know more about how it works, see Aspirin in the Garden.

  • 325 – 500 mg non-buffered aspirin, crushed (I use 500 mg)
  • 1 gallon purified water

1. Crush the aspirin with a mortar and pestle, add to the gallon of water, and shake well. Fill a spray bottle or use a gallon size sprayer and spray all the leaves of your plants in the early morning. Apply every two to three weeks.

2. The sooner you start using this spray on your plants, the better. If disease has already set in, you can still use this to give the plant a better chance of fighting it.

Baking Soda Foliar Spray

This spray helps a plant fight fungal diseases such as powdery and downy mildews and Septoria leaf spot. The baking soda in the spray increases the pH of the plant’s leaves, which makes the environment less conducive to fungi (which like acidic environments). For more details about this spray, as well as for other uses of baking soda in the garden, see Baking Soda in the Garden.

  • 1 Tablespoon baking soda
  • 1 Tablespoon horticultural oil (I use Neem oil)
  • 1/2 teaspoon castille soap or insecticidal soap (I use insecticidal soap as it’s what I have on hand)
  • 1 gallon purified water

1. Add all ingredients to the gallon of water and mix well. Fill a spray bottle or use a gallon size sprayer and spray all leaves of your plants in the early morning. Apply this spray weekly.

2. It’s important to begin using this spray as soon as you see the first signs of fungus. (If you live in a hot, humid climate like I do, it’s best to begin using this before you see signs of disease.) Please note: Do NOT store this mixture. If you don’t think you’ll use a full gallon, cut the recipe in half.

Epsom Salt Foliar Spray

This is a good feed for your plants, especially if you have problems with your soil. If your soil contains insufficient magnesium or – like mine – it has excessive calcium (which inhibits the plant’s ability to absorb the magnesium that is in the soil), epsom salt is a great supplement. An additional plus is that epsom salt also contains sulfur, which is another mineral plants need. For more information, see Epsom Salt in the Garden.

  • 1 Tablespoon epsom salt
  • 1 gallon purified water

1. Add epsom salt to the gallon of water and mix until the salt dissolves. Fill a spray bottle or use a gallon size sprayer and spray all the leaves of your plants early in the morning or late in the afternoon. (Just be sure to leave enough time before sunset for the leaves to dry. Wet leaves at night increases the chance of disease.) At this strength, you can apply it every two weeks.

2. If you wish to do this once a month, use one ounce (2 Tablespoons) of epsom salt per gallon of water.

3. If your plants are showing symptoms of magnesium deficiency (see Curing Magnesium Deficiency in the Garden), you can use 1 ounce of epsom salt/gallon of water every two weeks for a month, then go to 1 Tablespoon of epsom salt/gallon of water every two weeks.

There you have it – all my foliar spray recipes in one place. Let me know how these work for you in your garden.

Signature

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s