My First Glass Gem Corn Harvest

I’ve been waiting several months to start harvesting my Glass Gem corn, and harvest time is here. Last weekend, I picked about three-fourths of the ears growing on my seven-foot-tall stalks. Glass Gem corn is a flint corn that can be ground into corn meal or used as popcorn. When I first saw a picture of this Southwestern, Native American corn, I knew I had to try growing it. It’s beautiful! I wasn’t sure if it would grow here in the Southeast, but I’m pleased to say my first crop isn’t too shabby.

Early last week, I harvested my first few ears of Glass Gem corn. I couldn’t wait to open the husks to see what colors I had! Look at these beauties.

Glass Gem corn

Glass Gem corn

A few days later, I harvested 50 more ears. It was like Christmas as I opened each ear and oohed and aahed over the different colors. Here’s a sample of the different colored ears.

Glass Gem corn ~ circle of color!

Glass Gem corn ~ circle of color!

While pulling back the husks on all these ears of corn, I discovered several interesting things. First, many ears had one or more kernels that were popping on the ear! See? I told you it’s hot down in the South!

Popped kernel on Glass Gem corn

Popped kernel on Glass Gem corn

Unlike the corn you buy in the grocery store (most of which is hybrid), corn like Glass Gem doesn’t have even rows of kernels. Look how this cob has kernels spiraling around the cob.

Spiraled kernels on Glass Gem corn

Spiraled kernels on Glass Gem corn

I harvested several small ears, but even they had full-sized kernels.

Small ear of Glass Gem corn with full-sized kernels

Small ear of Glass Gem corn with full-sized kernels

One ear of corn had two more ears-in-the-making next to it. It seems this ear tried to be triplets, but only the middle ear grew a full cob and was pollinated.

Glass Gem corn ear that tried to be a triplet

Glass Gem corn ear that tried to be a triplet

Ever wonder what a corn cob looks like when it’s not pollinated? Look at the tip of this one. It almost looks like wheat kernels.

Ear of Glass Gem corn with unpollinated end

Ear of Glass Gem corn with unpollinated end

On this ear, the cob developed but only a few kernels grew.

Glass Gem corn ear with only a few kernels

Glass Gem corn ear with only a few kernels

I’m looking forward to harvesting the rest of my corn. Now I have to let it dry inside for several weeks before I can remove the kernels and store it for popping.

Have you ever grown Glass Gem corn?

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