How My Garden Grows in June ~ Part 2

Yesterday, I shared with you pictures of half my garden this month, compared to pictures last month. Everything has grown so much! If you missed yesterday’s post, you can see Part 1 here. Today, I’ll share with you the rest of my garden with links to last month’s pictures, so you can see the change.

BED 10 – Snap Beans & Nasturtiums

Needless to say, the beans have overflowed the bed. Unfortunately, my idea to plant the nasturtiums in the center of the bed wasn’t a good one. They’re not growing well because the beans are overshadowing them. (Nasturtiums are a good companion plant, and I planted the smaller variety.) Click here to see the beans in May.

Bed 10 in June ~ Snap beans & nasturtiums (which you can't see)

Bed 10 in June ~ Snap beans & nasturtiums

BED 11 – Carrots

Believe it or not, I planted close to 300 carrot seeds in this bed. I think the intense heat so early in the season prevented much of the seed from germinating. However, I have some carrots growing. They should be ready to harvest in another month. Click here to see them in May.

Bed 11 in June ~ Carrots

Bed 11 in June ~ Carrots

BED 12 – Peruvian peppers & Ruby chard

You can definitely see the difference in growth in this bed since last month. I have quite a few peppers on these plants and can’t wait to harvest them. The rocoto peppers are from my own seed and they’re bigger than last year’s fruit. Again, I wonder if it’s due to the Azomite rock dust I added to the soil. You can see a few of the chard in the back left part of the photo.

Bed 12 in June ~ Peruvian peppers and Ruby chard

Bed 12 in June ~ Peruvian peppers and Ruby chard

BED 12x – Eggplant

My experiment with planting spinach among the eggplant didn’t work. The spinach did poorly. I think it was more due to the intense heat than anything else, so I’ll try again next year. As for the eggplant, for some reason, the plants on the right side of the bed are much bigger than those on the left side. The right side does get a bit more sun during the day than the left side, but I can’t believe that’d be the only cause of such a difference. Fortunately, it’s not affecting fruiting as I’ve picked two eggplants from the left two front plants already. The back plants are Black Beauty; the front plants are Listada de Gandia. Click here to see them in May.

Bed 12x in June ~ Eggplant

Bed 12x in June ~ Eggplant

BED 13 – Raspberries

I took this month’s picture from a different angle than I did last month, but you can still see how much they’ve grown. This is an everbearing variety, but I don’t have any flowers yet. I’m getting antsy for some raspberries!

Bed 13 in June ~ Raspberries

Bed 13 in June ~ Raspberries

BED 14 – Asparagus

After all this time, only two of the ten purple passion asparagus I planted in the front of the bed have come up. I’m not sure what happened; maybe the ice storms killed the roots? I don’t have as many spears/stalks of my Mary Washington asparagus (in the back of the bed) as I should either. My harvest should’ve been twice last year’s harvest because this is my third year, but it was actually HALF of last year’s harvest. 😦 At least the fern is pretty and it’s producing seed. Click here to see the asparagus in May.

Bed 14 in June ~ Asparagus

Bed 14 in June ~ Asparagus

BED 15 – Onions

My onions are running a little late this year; then again, I planted them a little later than usual. They’re starting to fall down (compare them to last month when they were straight and tall), so they’re almost ready to harvest.

Bed 15 in June ~ Onions

Bed 15 in June ~ Onions

BED 16 – Fallow

This is the bed I had the garlic in last month. I let it lay fallow for a couple weeks, covered in grass clippings. I’m going to add some of my own compost to it this weekend and try planting Dixie speckled butterpeas (a Southern type of lima bean that I’m planting for the first time). I’ve heard that legumes shouldn’t be planted after alliums because the bean growth could be stunted, but I’ve also read on a few garden forums that others have had success planting beans after garlic and onions. I’m hoping the two weeks’ break, grass clippings, and compost will ameliorate any possible negative affects from the garlic. You know I’ll keep you posted on that.

Bed 16 in June ~ Fallow (ready to plant butterpeas)

Bed 16 in June ~ Fallow (ready to plant butterpeas)

BED 17 – Lima beans & nasturtiums

Like the snap beans, the lima beans have overshadowed the nasturtiums I planted in the center of the bed. Live and learn, eh? My lima beans have more than doubled in size since last month, and they have pods on them now.

Bed 17 in June ~ Lima beans & nasturtiums

Bed 17 in June ~ Lima beans & nasturtiums

BED 18 – Magenta orach, purslane, & perpetual spinach

I’ve harvested quite a bit of my orach and perpetual spinach, and they keep growing. I got a couple of good harvests of the purslane (in the middle of the bed), but something has eaten all the tops off. (I think it’s the small green grasshoppers I’ve found in my garden recently.) It’s just as well because they were going to seed! Click here to see how much they’ve grown since May.

Bed 18 in June ~ Magenta orach, purslane, & perpetual spinach

Bed 18 in June ~ Magenta orach, purslane, & perpetual spinach

BED 19 – Peppers & peanuts

Last month, I had potatoes growing in this bed. I harvested them shortly after I took the May picture. Now, I have peppers that were my leftover seedlings I had no other place for and no one wanted (I just couldn’t bear throwing them away) and peanuts. The peanuts are just starting to come up.

Bed 19 in June ~ Peppers & peanuts

Bed 19 in June ~ Peppers & peanuts

BED 20 – Black Krim tomatoes, herbs, & peppers

This seems to be my “catch all” bed. It was supposed to be just for herbs, but I found those Black Krim tomatoes and planted them here. Then most of my herbs didn’t germinate – just the borage and a couple purple basil. I have since resown some herbs – more purple basil, some Emily basil, summer savory, thyme, and chives. I also transplanted more leftover seedlings – a Wisconsin tomato and a couple of peppers (cayenne and jalapeno). Even though this picture is at a different angle than last month’s, you can still see how much the Black Krim tomatoes (on the left) and borage have grown.

Bed 20 in June ~ Black Krim tomatoes, herbs, & peppers

Bed 20 in June ~ Black Krim tomatoes, herbs, & peppers

Again, if you missed the June pictures of my garden set up and beds 1-9, go to How My Garden Grows in June Part 1. Next month, I’ll post pictures of my beds again, to see the changes another month brings.

How is your garden growing?

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2 comments on “How My Garden Grows in June ~ Part 2

  1. Hi Rosemarie, my carrot and spinach germination was also poor and I planted them even earlier than you. In the future, I will plant them as a fall crop. The carrots that did germinate are growing well. The spinach was a complete bust. What came up never did well. What is perpetual spinach? I am growing malabar spinach for the summer. Peg

    • I did okay with my spinach and carrots that I planted in February. This batch was an experiment – to see if they would grow if shaded by eggplant. It got too hot, too soon. Oh, well. I’ll try it again next year. Perpetual spinach is more like chard than a spinach, but I think it’s sweeter than chard. It is growing VERY well in the heat. Great summer green. You can eat it raw in a salad or saute it like spinach. 🙂

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