Spring Flowers

It’s the end of April, and we’ve had several gully-washer rain storms in the past two weeks. It makes me think of that old phrase, “April showers bring May flowers.” Because spring fever is now rampant in every hardiness zone, I thought the first post of May should be pictures of spring flowers. Some pictures were taken last year – like the eggplant flower in the picture above. Other pictures¬†show what’s blooming in my garden now.

My favorite flower in the garden is the Moonflower. It grows like a Morning Glory, but it blooms at night – and is spent by the next morning. The coolest thing is how the flower untwists to open, and then it releases the most fragrant scent! I wish I could bottle it. I gathered the seed from the small patch I grew last year, and I’ll be planting them all along my fence this weekend.

Moonflower bud

Moonflower bud

Moonflower bud twisting open

Moonflower open

Moonflower open

Another interesting flower I grew last year (and intend to grow again), is Amish Cockscomb. I planned to enter this flower at the fair in October last year, but a bad rain storm destroyed it. <sigh> Maybe this year.

Amish Cockscomb 2012

Amish Cockscomb ~ Summer 2012

My favorite wildflower in my yard this year is blue-eyed grass. Some consider this a weed, but it’s just too pretty.

Blue-eyed grass flower

Blue-eyed grass flower ~ April 2013

How many of you remember that your fruit and vegetable garden gives you beautiful flowers, too? The eggplant flower (above) is gorgeous. So are these:

Key Lime flowers Jan 2013

Key Lime flowers ~ January 2013

Strawberry flower Jan 2013

Strawberry flower ~ January 2013

White onion flower ~ fall 2012

White onion flower ~ fall 2012

Fingerling potato flower ~ April 2013

Fingerling potato flower ~ April 2013

Snow pea flower ~ April 2013

Snow pea flower ~ April 2013

Zucchini flower ~ Spring 2012

Zucchini flower ~ Spring 2012

Tomatillo flower ~ April 2013

Tomatillo flower ~ April 2013

Tomato flower ~ April 2013

Tomato flower ~ April 2013

Don’t be so impatient for the fruit that you neglect to see the flowering beauty in your garden.

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